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11/24/2014
The Annual NCI Director's Award Ceremony recognizing employees for their contributions and achievements throughout the year.

Air date: 12/1/2014 2:00:00 PM


11/24/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to https://ccr.cancer.gov/trainee-resources-courses-workshops-traco

Air date: 12/1/2014 4:00:00 PM


11/24/2014

“Global Health" is the new buzz phrase for traditional public health writ large. It encompasses everything from acute infectious diseases to chronic maladies, all of which can become border-crossing epidemics of microbial or behavioral origin. Dr. Alfred Sommer, Dean Emeritus of the Bloomberg School of Public Health, and University Distinguished Service Professor of Epidemiology, Ophthalmology and International Health at Johns Hopkins University, has spent a lifetime crossing national boundaries and medical disciplines. He will discuss some of his more memorable interactions, and their present day relevance, ranging from the containment of infectious epidemics to the prevention and treatment of blinding diseases.

Sponsored by the National Eye Institute, NIH

For more information go to http://www.nei.nih.gov/meetings

Air date: 12/2/2014 12:00:00 PM


11/24/2014

Welcome to the first DDM Seminar of 2014-2015. To receive credit for watching the Videocast, you need to register for the event in LMS on the morning of the event.

The seminar will feature speaker, Joseph Grenny. Mr. Grenny is well known for his best selling books on "Crucial Conversations." This seminar will address another of his bestselling books, "Influencer: The New Science of Leading Change."

The truth is, we all need to be better influencers. Hardly a day passes that we don’t try to influence others to do something differently. We do our best to motivate colleagues to demonstrate concern for our projects or our approach to various problems. We struggle to enable our teams to complete projects on time and on budget. This seminar will address the six sources of influence that affect behavior change. By learning these techniques, you’ll be better equipped and prepared to communicate with and influence others in a positive direction.

Well-known for his New York Times bestselling books on “Crucial Conversations,” Joseph Grenny is an expert in topics related to leadership, organizational effectiveness, and change. He is also the co-author of “Influencer: The New Science of Leading Change” and “Change Anything: The New Science of Personal Success.” Mr. Grenny has delivered thousands of presentations in his career to international audiences from private sector to government. He was recognized as an Entrepreneur of the Year by Ernst & Young in 2007 when he co-founded VitalSmarts, a leader in corporate training and organizational development.

For more information go to http://www.ddmseries.od.nih.gov/

Air date: 12/4/2014 11:00:00 AM


11/24/2014

The NIH Common Fund High-Risk High-Reward (HRHR) Program seeks to support exceptionally creative investigators who propose bold research ideas of unusually broad impact. The intent of the HRHR symposium is to bring together these outstanding researchers so that they may exchange research results, network with each other, and perhaps forge new collaborations. Addtional information about the High Risk-High Reward program is available at http://commonfund.nih.gov/highrisk/

Addtional information about the High Risk-High Reward program is available at http://commonfund.nih.gov/highrisk/

Air date: 12/17/2014 8:00:00 AM


11/21/2014

The NIH Common Fund High-Risk High-Reward (HRHR) Program seeks to support exceptionally creative investigators who propose bold research ideas of unusally broad impace. The intent of the HRHR symposium is to bring together these outstanding researchers so that they may exchange research results, network with each other, and perhaps forge new collaborations.

Addtional information about the High Risk-High Reward program is available at http://commonfund.nih.gov/highrisk

Air date: 12/16/2014 8:00:00 AM


11/21/2014

The NIH Common Fund High-Risk High-Reward (HRHR) Program seeks to support exceptionally creative investigators who propose bold research ideas of unusually broad impact. The intent of the HRHR symposium is to bring together these outstanding researchers so that they may exchange research results, network with each other, and perhaps forge new collaborations. Addtional information about the High Risk-High Reward program is available at http://commonfund.nih.gov/highrisk/

Addtional information about the High Risk-High Reward program is available at http://commonfund.nih.gov/highrisk/

Air date: 12/15/2014 8:00:00 AM


11/20/2014

Neuroscience Seminar Series

Air date: 12/15/2014 12:00:00 PM


11/20/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to https://ccr.cancer.gov/trainee-resources-courses-workshops-traco

Air date: 11/24/2014 4:00:00 PM


11/20/2014

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a complex, multifaceted disorder characterized by extreme fatigue and a host of other symptoms that can worsen after physical or mental activity, but do not improve with rest. In addition to extreme fatigue, people with ME/CFS may also experience:

Widespread muscle and joint pain
Sore throat
Tender lymph nodes in the neck or armpit
Headaches
Sleep problems
Difficulty with short-term memory or concentration
Effects of the illness can range from moderate to debilitating, and can substantially impact everyday functioning. Routine daily activities such as cooking meals, brushing teeth, and caring for children become difficult. Additionally, sensitivity to environmental factors (e.g., noise, light, chemicals) may force many individuals with ME/CFS into seclusion or withdrawal from society.

The onset of ME/CFS symptoms may be sudden—for example, immediately following a viral illness such as the flu—or gradual, with no discernible attachment to a specific event or time. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports over 1 million adults with ME/CFS in the United States, and recent evidence has shown a higher prevalence in females compared to males. Certain racial/ethnic groups have also been found to be at an increased risk for ME/CFS; most notably Native American and African American populations. The economic burden of ME/CFS, including annual health care costs, is estimated to be between $1.9 billion and $7.2 billion.

There are many aspects of ME/CFS that are problematic. First, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. There are differing views as to whether ME/CFS is a central nervous system, metabolic, infectious or post-infectious, cardiovascular, immune system, or other type of disorder. Second, there is little agreement among clinical and research professionals, as well as patient groups, regarding the name of the illness. The name myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME is more commonly used in Europe and Canada, while the name chronic fatigue syndrome or CFS is used more often in the United States and Australia. Yet the acronym ME/CFS is increasingly being used worldwide. Third, no laboratory tests exist for diagnosing ME/CFS, and its diagnosis is one of exclusion. All other illnesses with overlapping symptoms must be ruled out prior to an ME/CFS diagnosis. Fourth, there are no drugs or therapies approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat ME/CFS. Clinical trials to test drug or therapy effectiveness, and drug development to target the underlying cause, are difficult to conduct because of the unknown causes, varied symptom profile, and lack of concurrence regarding diagnostic criteria. Lastly, medical professionals disagree on many aspects of ME/CFS, including whether the illness is real, and there is no definitive answer about the effectiveness of current therapies (e.g., diet, use of off-label or experimental drugs).

The 2014 Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Advancing the Research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome will seek to clarify:

How the research on ME/CFS using multiple case definitions has contributed to the state of the current scientific literature on diagnosis, pathophysiology, treatment, cure, and prevention of ME/CFS

How the measurement outcomes (tools and measures) currently used by researchers of ME/CFS are able to distinguish among those patients diagnosed with ME/CFS, including the sensitivity of the tools and measures to identify subsets of patients according to duration, severity, nature of the illness, onset characteristics, and other categorizations

How the research on treatments or therapies shown to be effective in addressing symptoms of ME/CFS will lead to an understanding of the underlying pathology associated with ME/CFS

How innovative research approaches have provided an understanding of the pathophysiology of ME/CFS, and how this knowledge can be applied to the development of effective and safe treatments.

Initial planning for each Pathways to Prevention workshop, regardless of condition, is coordinated by a Working Group that nominates panelists and speakers, and develops and finalizes questions that frame the workshop. After finalizing the questions, an evidence report is prepared by an Evidence-based Practice Center, through a contract with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). During the 2-day workshop, invited experts discuss the body of evidence, and attendees have opportunities to provide comments during open discussion periods. After weighing evidence from the evidence report, expert presentations, and public comments, an unbiased, independent panel prepares a draft report that identifies research gaps and future research priorities. The draft report is posted on the ODP website, and public comments are accepted for 14 days. The final report is then released approximately 2 weeks later.

For more information go to https://prevention.nih.gov/programs-events/pathways-to-prevention/upcoming-workshops/me-cfs

Air date: 12/9/2014 8:00:00 AM


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This page last reviewed: December 14, 2010