Skip over global navigation links

Video conferencing

8/19/2014
Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Multi-council Working Group on August 25, 2014

For more information go to http://www.nih.gov/science/brain/how.htm

Air date: 8/25/2014 8:30:00 AM


8/19/2014

NLM Advisory Council Meeting

For more information go to http://www.nlm.nih.gov/od/bor/bor.html

Air date: 9/9/2014 9:00:00 AM


8/18/2014

GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) Summer Seminar

The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) cordially invites you to its summer seminar, featuring Dr. Etienne Sibille. Dr. Sibille is the Campbell Family chair in Clinical Neuroscince, in the Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute , Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Dr. Sibille’s research goals have consistently focused on translational research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular bases of depression, and specifically of the mood and affect dysregulation components of the illness. Studies in his laboratory encompass parallel investigations in postmortem brains of depressed and control subjects, and in genetic and environmental rodent models, with the aims of characterizing the primary pathology of depression and assessing causal links between identified molecular changes or candidate neurotransmitter systems and mood regulation. Current projects include translating human postmortem findings on the role of the GABA microcircuitry in mood regulation, and specifically of reduced somatostatin-positive dendritic targeting interneuron function. In addition, they have demonstrated that biological pathways affected during aging of the human brain largely overlap with neuropsychiatric and other neurological disease pathways and may in fact promote diseases, together providing a compelling rationale for investigating aging and diseases simultaneously. These latter hypotheses are now being tested in parallel in the human postmortem brain and in large epidemiological studies of subjects at the “vigor-to-frailty transition.”

The GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) was formed to enhance opportunities for discussion of the intersection between the biology of aging and the biology of disease and conditions that are of interest across ICs. It is focused on basic biology, but with a longer view towards translation. If you are interested in learning more, please visit the GSIG web site (http://sigs.nih.gov/geroscience/Pages/default.aspx).

Air date: 9/4/2014 12:00:00 PM


8/18/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers.courses/traco

Air date: 12/8/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/18/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers.courses/traco

Air date: 12/1/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/18/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers.courses/traco

Air date: 11/24/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/18/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers.courses/traco

Air date: 11/17/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/18/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers.courses/traco

Air date: 11/10/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/18/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers.courses/traco

Air date: 11/3/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/18/2014

TRACO

Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in development and implementation of many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers.courses/traco

Air date: 10/27/2014 4:00:00 PM


Up to Top

This page last reviewed: December 14, 2010