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Video conferencing

9/18/2014
The NSABB is a federal advisory committee that addresses issues related to biosecurity and dual use research at the request of the United States Government. The NSABB will be conducting a face-to-face meeting on October 22, 2014.

For more information go to http://osp.od.nih.gov/office-biotechnology-activities/biosecurity/nsabb/nsabb-meetings-and-conferences

Air date: 10/22/2014 8:15:00 AM


9/17/2014

The opening plenary session will have a variety of presentations this year. We will start the plenary with a welcome by NIH Director Francis Collins and then have the FARE Awards Ceremony and two scientific lectures. The Fellows Award for Research Excellence (FARE) Program is in its 20th year of providing recognition for the outstanding scientific research performed by intramural fellows. There will be a short ceremony to recognize the FARE winners from this year. We then will have two 30-minute lectures by Drs. Antonello Bonci and Mark Hallett about their latest brain research on addiction and movement, respectively.

For more information go to http://researchfestival.nih.gov/2014/opening_session.shtml

Air date: 9/22/2014 10:00:00 AM


9/16/2014

This is the final seminar of the 2014 Deputy Director for Management (DDM) Seminar Series. To receive credit for watching the videocast, you need to register for the event in LMS on the morning of the event. The seminar will feature speaker, Dr. Dan Ariely. Dr. Ariely is the James B. Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University. He is the author of the New York Times bestselling books, “Predictably Irrational,” “The Upside of Irrationality,” and “The Honest Truth About Dishonesty.”

One of the challenges of human life is that what is good for us right now is often not the fun choice, even though it's good for us in the long term. Dieting, for example, is not so much fun now, but good for the future. Saving money is not fun now but good for the future. This applies to other things, such as getting medical testing or sitting down to write a long report. When we face such tradeoffs we often focus on the short term rather than our long term goals, and in the process get ourselves into trouble. But wait! There is hope! By understanding where we fall short, there are methods we can use to overcome our natural (and less than desirable) inclinations in order to become happier and more productive people.

Dr. Dan Ariely has spent his career researching interesting questions that explain complex (and sometimes irrational) human behavior. Dr. Ariely is the James B. Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University. He is a founding member of the Center for Advanced Hindsight and the author of the New York Times bestselling books, "Predictably Irrational," "The Upside of Irrationality," and "The Honest Truth About Dishonesty." In 2013, Bloomberg recognized Dr. Ariely as one of the Top 50 Most Influential Thinkers. He also has a bi-weekly advice column in the Wall Street Journal called "Ask Ariely." Find out more at http://www.danariely.com

For more information go to http://www.ddmseries.od.nih.gov/

Air date: 9/25/2014 11:00:00 AM


9/11/2014

The purpose of this conference is to provide an opportunity for scientists from the Center for Cancer Research, other NCI divisions and other NIH Institutes, as well as the extramural community (academia and biotech), to gather and exchange information about the latest developments in research pertaining to the immunotherapy of cancer. This conference is held annually and has become one of the premier meetings in the field.

For more information go to http://ncifrederick.cancer.gov/events/CancerImmunology/

Air date: 10/10/2014 8:30:00 AM


9/10/2014

This workshop on infectious disease imaging is sponsored by the Center for Infectious Disease Imaging, a joint enterprise of the NIH Clinical Center Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and the NIAID Division of Clinical Research. The meeting will include lectures by invited experts on preclinical imaging studies in laboratory animals and clinical studies in patients. Presentations will also review current research and plans for future imaging studies in biocontainment laboratories at the Integrated Research Facility and USAMRIID at Fort Detrick, the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Louisville. A number of shorter reports will describe current research by investigators at NIH, Johns Hopkins, FDA and other institutions. For more information, contact Mike Bray in the Division of Clinical Research, NIAID.

Air date: 9/25/2014 8:25:00 AM


9/9/2014

The Symposium will provide an opportunity for all leaders within HHS to learn about the significance of the next-generation Internet (IPv6) and its impact on the programs and mission of HHS. We will have experts from Internet registries/organizations, Internet service providers, cellular telecom providers, major IT product vendors and in-house government experts who will share their insight, best practices and lessons learned in the implementation of IPv6.

Air date: 10/15/2014 8:30:00 AM


9/9/2014

The purpose of this conference is to provide an opportunity for scientists from the Center for Cancer Research, other NCI divisions and other NIH Institutes, as well as the extramural community (academia and biotech), to gather and exchange information about the latest developments in research pertaining to the immunotherapy of cancer. This conference is held annually and has become one of the premier meetings in the field.

For more information go to http://ncifrederick.cancer.gov/events/CancerImmunology

Air date: 10/9/2014 8:15:00 AM


9/5/2014

The CTAC makes recommendations on the NCI-supported national clinical trials enterprise to build a strong scientific infrastructure by bringing together a broadly developed and engaged coalition of stakeholders involved in the clinical trial process.

For more information go to http://deainfo.nci.nih.gov/advisory/ctac/ctacmeetings.htm

Air date: 11/12/2014 9:00:00 AM


9/2/2014

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a complex, multifaceted disorder characterized by extreme fatigue and a host of other symptoms that can worsen after physical or mental activity, but do not improve with rest. In addition to extreme fatigue, people with ME/CFS may also experience:

Widespread muscle and joint pain
Sore throat
Tender lymph nodes in the neck or armpit
Headaches
Sleep problems
Difficulty with short-term memory or concentration
Effects of the illness can range from moderate to debilitating, and can substantially impact everyday functioning. Routine daily activities such as cooking meals, brushing teeth, and caring for children become difficult. Additionally, sensitivity to environmental factors (e.g., noise, light, chemicals) may force many individuals with ME/CFS into seclusion or withdrawal from society.

The onset of ME/CFS symptoms may be sudden—for example, immediately following a viral illness such as the flu—or gradual, with no discernible attachment to a specific event or time. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports over 1 million adults with ME/CFS in the United States, and recent evidence has shown a higher prevalence in females compared to males. Certain racial/ethnic groups have also been found to be at an increased risk for ME/CFS; most notably Native American and African American populations. The economic burden of ME/CFS, including annual health care costs, is estimated to be between $1.9 billion and $7.2 billion.

There are many aspects of ME/CFS that are problematic. First, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. There are differing views as to whether ME/CFS is a central nervous system, metabolic, infectious or post-infectious, cardiovascular, immune system, or other type of disorder. Second, there is little agreement among clinical and research professionals, as well as patient groups, regarding the name of the illness. The name myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME is more commonly used in Europe and Canada, while the name chronic fatigue syndrome or CFS is used more often in the United States and Australia. Yet the acronym ME/CFS is increasingly being used worldwide. Third, no laboratory tests exist for diagnosing ME/CFS, and its diagnosis is one of exclusion. All other illnesses with overlapping symptoms must be ruled out prior to an ME/CFS diagnosis. Fourth, there are no drugs or therapies approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat ME/CFS. Clinical trials to test drug or therapy effectiveness, and drug development to target the underlying cause, are difficult to conduct because of the unknown causes, varied symptom profile, and lack of concurrence regarding diagnostic criteria. Lastly, medical professionals disagree on many aspects of ME/CFS, including whether the illness is real, and there is no definitive answer about the effectiveness of current therapies (e.g., diet, use of off-label or experimental drugs).

The 2014 Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Advancing the Research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome will seek to clarify:

How the research on ME/CFS using multiple case definitions has contributed to the state of the current scientific literature on diagnosis, pathophysiology, treatment, cure, and prevention of ME/CFS

How the measurement outcomes (tools and measures) currently used by researchers of ME/CFS are able to distinguish among those patients diagnosed with ME/CFS, including the sensitivity of the tools and measures to identify subsets of patients according to duration, severity, nature of the illness, onset characteristics, and other categorizations

How the research on treatments or therapies shown to be effective in addressing symptoms of ME/CFS will lead to an understanding of the underlying pathology associated with ME/CFS

How innovative research approaches have provided an understanding of the pathophysiology of ME/CFS, and how this knowledge can be applied to the development of effective and safe treatments.

Initial planning for each Pathways to Prevention workshop, regardless of condition, is coordinated by a Working Group that nominates panelists and speakers, and develops and finalizes questions that frame the workshop. After finalizing the questions, an evidence report is prepared by an Evidence-based Practice Center, through a contract with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). During the 2-day workshop, invited experts discuss the body of evidence, and attendees have opportunities to provide comments during open discussion periods. After weighing evidence from the evidence report, expert presentations, and public comments, an unbiased, independent panel prepares a draft report that identifies research gaps and future research priorities. The draft report is posted on the ODP website, and public comments are accepted for 14 days. The final report is then released approximately 2 weeks later.

For more information go to https://prevention.nih.gov/programs-events/pathways-to-prevention/upcoming-workshops/me-cfs

Air date: 12/10/2014 8:00:00 AM


9/2/2014

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a complex, multifaceted disorder characterized by extreme fatigue and a host of other symptoms that can worsen after physical or mental activity, but do not improve with rest. In addition to extreme fatigue, people with ME/CFS may also experience:

Widespread muscle and joint pain
Sore throat
Tender lymph nodes in the neck or armpit
Headaches
Sleep problems
Difficulty with short-term memory or concentration
Effects of the illness can range from moderate to debilitating, and can substantially impact everyday functioning. Routine daily activities such as cooking meals, brushing teeth, and caring for children become difficult. Additionally, sensitivity to environmental factors (e.g., noise, light, chemicals) may force many individuals with ME/CFS into seclusion or withdrawal from society.

The onset of ME/CFS symptoms may be sudden—for example, immediately following a viral illness such as the flu—or gradual, with no discernible attachment to a specific event or time. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports over 1 million adults with ME/CFS in the United States, and recent evidence has shown a higher prevalence in females compared to males. Certain racial/ethnic groups have also been found to be at an increased risk for ME/CFS; most notably Native American and African American populations. The economic burden of ME/CFS, including annual health care costs, is estimated to be between $1.9 billion and $7.2 billion.

There are many aspects of ME/CFS that are problematic. First, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. There are differing views as to whether ME/CFS is a central nervous system, metabolic, infectious or post-infectious, cardiovascular, immune system, or other type of disorder. Second, there is little agreement among clinical and research professionals, as well as patient groups, regarding the name of the illness. The name myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME is more commonly used in Europe and Canada, while the name chronic fatigue syndrome or CFS is used more often in the United States and Australia. Yet the acronym ME/CFS is increasingly being used worldwide. Third, no laboratory tests exist for diagnosing ME/CFS, and its diagnosis is one of exclusion. All other illnesses with overlapping symptoms must be ruled out prior to an ME/CFS diagnosis. Fourth, there are no drugs or therapies approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat ME/CFS. Clinical trials to test drug or therapy effectiveness, and drug development to target the underlying cause, are difficult to conduct because of the unknown causes, varied symptom profile, and lack of concurrence regarding diagnostic criteria. Lastly, medical professionals disagree on many aspects of ME/CFS, including whether the illness is real, and there is no definitive answer about the effectiveness of current therapies (e.g., diet, use of off-label or experimental drugs).

The 2014 Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Advancing the Research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome will seek to clarify:

How the research on ME/CFS using multiple case definitions has contributed to the state of the current scientific literature on diagnosis, pathophysiology, treatment, cure, and prevention of ME/CFS

How the measurement outcomes (tools and measures) currently used by researchers of ME/CFS are able to distinguish among those patients diagnosed with ME/CFS, including the sensitivity of the tools and measures to identify subsets of patients according to duration, severity, nature of the illness, onset characteristics, and other categorizations

How the research on treatments or therapies shown to be effective in addressing symptoms of ME/CFS will lead to an understanding of the underlying pathology associated with ME/CFS

How innovative research approaches have provided an understanding of the pathophysiology of ME/CFS, and how this knowledge can be applied to the development of effective and safe treatments.

Initial planning for each Pathways to Prevention workshop, regardless of condition, is coordinated by a Working Group that nominates panelists and speakers, and develops and finalizes questions that frame the workshop. After finalizing the questions, an evidence report is prepared by an Evidence-based Practice Center, through a contract with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). During the 2-day workshop, invited experts discuss the body of evidence, and attendees have opportunities to provide comments during open discussion periods. After weighing evidence from the evidence report, expert presentations, and public comments, an unbiased, independent panel prepares a draft report that identifies research gaps and future research priorities. The draft report is posted on the ODP website, and public comments are accepted for 14 days. The final report is then released approximately 2 weeks later.

For more information go to https://prevention.nih.gov/programs-events/pathways-to-prevention/upcoming-workshops/me-cfs

Air date: 12/9/2014 8:00:00 AM


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This page last reviewed: December 14, 2010