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Video conferencing

8/29/2014
The Disability Employment Awareness Series is a trio of workshops, sponsored by the Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI), designed to bring you information and strategies for the employment and inclusion of people with disabilities. This is the last program in FY14; it will focus on obesity in the workplace. When: Wednesday September 3, 2014 Where: Wilson Hall, Building 1 Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. PRESENTATION OVERVIEW: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention one in every three American adults is now considered obese, which is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher, and approximately another 40 percent are overweight. That is contributing significantly to diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and certain kinds of cancer. Join us for a panel discussion about the effects of obesity and learn more about accommodations for health conditions associated with obesity. Panelists: Tiffany M. Powell-Wiley, M.D., M.P.H. Assistant Clinical Investigator Social Determinants of Obesity and Cardiovascular Risk National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Kevin Hall, Ph.D. Senior Investigator Laboratory of Biological Modeling National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Marc L. Reitman, M.D., Ph.D. Chief, Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch Chief, Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch, Energy Homeostasis Section National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Air date: 9/3/2014 11:00:00 AM


8/28/2014

The Committee serves to advise and make recommendations to the Director, Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) on a broad range of topics including, the current scope of research on women's health and the influence of sex and gender on human health, efforts to understand the issues related to women in biomedical careers and their needs, and the current status of inclusion of women in clinical trials research.

Air date: 9/24/2014 8:00:00 AM


8/28/2014

NACMHD September Advisory Council Meeting

Air date: 9/9/2014 8:30:00 AM


8/28/2014

Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Although epigenetic changes in the cancer genome have been known for three decades, the role of epigenetics in common human disease and its relationship to genetic variation has only recently begun to be explored. The Feinberg lab has been developing whole-genome approaches to the epigenetic analysis of human disease and contributing to a new field of epigenetic epidemiology that integrates genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. One of the most exciting developments in this recent work is the idea that epigenetic plasticity under genetic control may confer a survival advantage in evolution, and may also be important in normal tissue differentiation and response to the environment. Dr. Feinberg has suggested a unifying model of cancer in which epigenetic dysregulation allows rapid selection for tumor cell survival at the expense of the host.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov

Air date: 9/3/2014 3:00:00 PM


8/28/2014

The Department of Bioethics offers this seven to eight week course annually each fall. The course is designed to provide an overview of the important issues in the ethics of human subject research for clinical investigators and others who participate in the conduct of research and is open to the entire NIH community as well as to those from outside NIH. Topics include the history of human subject research ethics, principles and guidelines, study design, subject recruitment, informed consent, and international research.

Air date: 10/1/2014 8:30:00 AM


8/28/2014

IND-Enabling Non-Clinical Safety Assessment of Candidate Drugs and Good Laboratory Practice Standards: The FDA Regulatory Perspective

An educational program of the NIH Clinical Center-FDA CDER Joint Task Force

Air date: 9/29/2014 2:00:00 PM


8/28/2014

Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Female mosquitoes require a blood meal to complete egg development. In carrying out this innate behavior, mosquitoes spread dangerous infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, and yellow fever. Humans attract mosquitoes via multiple sensory cues including emitted body odor, heat, and carbon dioxide in the breath. The mosquito perceives differences in these cues, both between and within species, to determine which animal or human to target for blood-feeding. This strong attraction to humans is strongly attenuated for up to 4 days after the female takes a blood-meal, suggesting the existence of a reversible blood-meal-induced behavioral switch. We have recently obtained evidence that neuropeptide signaling is an important factor in host-seeking suppression. We have identified human neuropeptide receptor agonists and antagonists that show dose-dependent modulation of host-seeking suppression, and have begun to link these drugs to endogenous Aedes aegypti neuropeptide receptors. Recent advances from my group in analyzing the molecular biology of host-seeking behavior and its modulation by neuropeptides will be discussed.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov

Air date: 9/17/2014 3:00:00 PM


8/28/2014

Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Social media is widely used by adolescents, these technology allow opportunities for teens to display and describe health attitudes, intentions and behaviors. These new technologies provide an innovative means to investigate adolescent health. For the past 7 years, we have been investigating how adolescents choose to display health behaviors on social media including substance use and depression symptoms. This talk will provide an overview of our methods and key findings, and illustrate challenges and opportunities in how adolescents interact with social media.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov

Air date: 9/10/2014 3:00:00 PM


8/28/2014


Office of Research on Women's Health

The “Methods and Techniques for Integrating the Biological Variable Sex in Preclinical Research” workshop sponsored by the Office of Research on Women’s Health will focus on the incorporation of sex in basic science research studies. Session Topics will include: The rational for including male and female subjects in studies; the impact of including or not including sex as a basic biological variable; practical methods to integrate the biological variable “sex” into research projects; and how to cultivate a culture of “Sex Matters” across multiple disciplines. The workshop will include presentations from Dr. Lawrence Tabak, Deputy Director, NIH and Dr. Lawrence Cahill, Professor, University of California, Irvine.

For more information go to http://orwh.od.nih.gov

Air date: 10/20/2014 7:45:00 AM


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This page last reviewed: December 14, 2010