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Video conferencing

5/26/2015
The purpose of these workshops is to educate the NIH intramural research community about what advanced technologies can accomplish and the kinds of reproducibility problems that can arise; provide a cautionary note to scientists who hope to use but are inexperienced with various new modeling techniques; and educate others who are attempting to interpret results in the literature.

For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov/reproducibility

Air date: 6/4/2015 12:30:00 PM


5/26/2015

Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series (WALS)

For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals

Air date: 6/3/2015 3:00:00 PM


5/26/2015

Are you a parent of a school-age child? Are you stuck on when to start giving your child an allowance and how much? Is your child a spender or a saver? Do you need help on how to teach your child good financial habits?

If so, please bring your lunch and join other NIH parents for this informative seminar where you will learn a step-by-step approach to helping your child to become a habitual saver, smart money manager, and responsible decision maker

Sponsors: NIH Federal Credit Union & the Office of Research Services, DATS, NIH.

For more information go to http://childcare.ors.nih.gov

Air date: 6/3/2015 12:00:00 PM


5/26/2015

Day 2 of a two day workshop held by the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Working Group of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) will host a public workshop on digital health data and research cohort design as they relate to the proposed PMI national research cohort. The workshop will focus on solutions to challenges in the design, composition, and organizational characteristics of a national research cohort of one million or more volunteers. For more information about this workshop, please go to the workshop page on the PMI website:
http://www.nih.gov/precisionmedicine/workshop-20150528.htm

Air date: 5/29/2015 8:00:00 AM


5/26/2015

Day 1 of a two-day workshop by the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Working Group of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) will host a public workshop on digital health data and research cohort design as they relate to the proposed PMI national research cohort. The workshop will focus on solutions to challenges in the design, composition, and organizational characteristics of a national research cohort of one million or more volunteers. For more information about this workshop, please go to the workshop page on the PMI website:
http://www.nih.gov/precisionmedicine/workshop-20150528.htm

Air date: 5/28/2015 8:30:00 AM


5/26/2015

Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

The neural crest is a population of multipotent, migratory stem/progenitor cells that forms at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm in vertebrate embryos. These cells then migrate from the neural tube along defined pathways, populate numerous sites, and differentiate into diverse cells types including melanocytes, sensory and autonomic neurons, and the craniofacial skeleton. However, neural crest populations differ along the neural axis with respect to migration pathways and derivatives. For example, cranial neural crest cells give rise to cartilage and bone of the face, whereas those at trunk levels do not. Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) composed of interacting transcriptional regulators and downstream effector genes are thought to confer properties such as multipotency and migratory capacity to nascent neural crest cell populations. GRNs have been characterized for the cranial neural crest, but GRN differences along the body axis are not well understood.

Dr. Bronner's lab is seeking to gain insight into the GRNs by using axial level specific enhancers to isolate neural crest subpopulations and perform transcriptome analysis. The lab then tests functional connections in the neural crest GRNs by systematically perturbing transcription factors to establish their role in specification and examining the effect of these perturbations on downstream genes in order to establish interrelationships. The results suggest that a series of regulatory circuits is involved in inducing the migratory neural crest cell population, maintaining its stem cell properties for a time, and finally leading to progressive differentiation with both common and differential GRN components present at different axial levels. Ultimately, the genes and genetic subcircuits discovered in this study may be useful targets for therapeutic intervention and for guiding directed differentiation of neural crest stem cells into particular derivatives for the purpose of repair/regeneration.

For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals

Air date: 5/27/2015 3:00:00 PM


5/26/2015

Annual John Daly Memorial Lecture

Pungent irritants from pepper, mint and mustard plants have served as powerful for identifying molecules, cells and circuits that contribute to sensation and pain. Dr. Julius has exploited the power of natural products to reveal the molecular mechanisms behind how we feel, sense and touch.

It is quite appropriate for him to deliver the lecture in memory of Dr. John Daly, a noted natural products chemist and pharmacologist in NIDDK.

Air date: 5/27/2015 1:00:00 PM


5/21/2015

This 2015 NIH & FDA Glycosciences Research Day meeting explores the important roles glycans and the lectins that bind them play in Virology, Immunity, Infection, Development, and Disease.

For more information go to https://meetings.nigms.nih.gov/?ID=19237

Air date: 5/28/2015 8:30:00 AM


5/21/2015

Immunology Interest Group

Dr. Karolina Palucka is an internationally recognized clinical oncologist and cancer immunologist. She joined The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine (JAX) as professor and associate director of cancer immunology in 2014. Prior to joining JAX, Karolina was the Michael A.E. Ramsay Chair for Cancer Immunology Research and director of the Ralph M. Steinman Center for Cancer Vaccines at the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research in Dallas, where she was principal investigator of a large research award from the Human Immunology Project Consortium. She is also professor of oncological sciences and clinical immunology at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York. Karolina is a leader in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Her research exploits dendritic cells, which control the body’s immune response to tumors, as the basis for new vaccines against melanomas and other human cancers. By combining outstanding cutting-edge immunology and experimental models, including humanized mice, with human trials, she is advancing the field of cancer immunotherapy and her talks bring together basic and translational work into an exciting whole.

For more information go to http://sigs.nih.gov/immunology/Pages/default.aspx

Air date: 5/27/2015 4:15:00 PM


5/21/2015

National Library of Medicine Informatics Lecture Series

There is an urgent need to translate genome-era discoveries into clinical utility, but the difficulties in making bench-to-bedside translations have been well described. The nascent field of translational bioinformatics may help. Dr. Butte's lab builds and applies computational tools to convert hundreds of trillions of points of molecular, clinical, and epidemiological data collected by researchers and clinicians worldwide over the past decade, now commonly known as “big data”, into new diagnostics, therapeutics, and insights into rare and common diseases. Dr. Butte, a bioinformatician and pediatric endocrinologist, will highlight how publicly-available molecular measurements to find new uses for drugs including drug repositioning for inflammatory bowel disease, discovering new treatable inflammatory mechanisms of disease in type 2 diabetes, and how the next generation of biotech companies might even start in your garage.

Atul Butte, MD, PhD is the founding Director of the newly-established Institute of Computational Health Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, and a Professor of Pediatrics. Prior to his new position, he was the chief of the Division of Systems Medicine and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, where he has been a faculty member for the past decade. Trained in both Computer Science and Medicine at Brown University, Dr. Butte previously worked as a software engineer at Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp., and received his PhD in Health Sciences and Technology from Harvard Medical School and MIT. He has authored nearly 200 publications, with research repeatedly featured in the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal and Wired Magazine. In 2013, Dr. Butte was recognized by the White House as an Open Science Champion of Change for promoting science through publicly available data. Dr. Butte is also a founder of several Bay Area biotech startup companies. He is also a member of the National Library of Medicine Biomedical Library and Informatics Review Committee.

Air date: 6/3/2015 2:00:00 PM


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This page last reviewed: December 14, 2010