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Video conferencing

5/5/2015
The June 18, 2015, joint meeting of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Advisory Council and the Cures Acceleration Network (CAN) Review Board will feature presentations by NCATS leadership, members of the Advisory Council and CAN Review Board, and invited guests. Presentations will feature, in part, new information about the NCATS’ Discovering New Therapeutic Uses for Existing Molecules and Clinical and Translational Science Awards programs. The Advisory Council Subcommittee on Partnerships with Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Companies and Venture Capital Firms also will provide an update. In addition, NCATS staff will present a proposed initiative concept for Council/CAN Review Board consideration and clearance. For more information, visit: http://www.ncats.nih.gov/about/ncats-council/council.html and http://www.ncats.nih.gov/about/can-board/can-board.html.

For more information go to http://www.ncats.nih.gov/events

Air date: 6/18/2015 8:30:00 AM


5/5/2015

The National Toxicology Program (NTP) and Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) are convening an expert panel to identify research needs related to the safe use of high intakes of folic acid based on consideration of the state of the science. The expert panel meeting will bring together experts from multiple disciplines including, but not limited to, epidemiology, nutrition, medicine, and toxicology. In preparation for this evaluation, screening of the literature was undertaken to identify potential adverse health effects for which further research might be warranted. A literature review document is being prepared on four health outcome areas using systematic review methodology: (1) cancer, (2) cognition in conjunction with vitamin B12, (3) hypersensitivity-related outcomes, and (4) endocrine and metabolic outcomes. The literature review document should be available by April 6, 2015, and will be posted to http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/730864. A document describing the approach for conducting the literature evaluation has also been prepared and is posted on the NTP Website (http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/ohat/folicacid/ntpfolicacid_approach_508.pdf). This document describing the approach includes information on the dose levels of folic acid being considered for the evaluation.

For more information go to http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/730864

Air date: 5/12/2015 8:00:00 AM


5/5/2015

The National Toxicology Program (NTP) and Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) are convening an expert panel to identify research needs related to the safe use of high intakes of folic acid based on consideration of the state of the science. The expert panel meeting will bring together experts from multiple disciplines including, but not limited to, epidemiology, nutrition, medicine, and toxicology. In preparation for this evaluation, screening of the literature was undertaken to identify potential adverse health effects for which further research might be warranted. A literature review document is being prepared on four health outcome areas using systematic review methodology: (1) cancer, (2) cognition in conjunction with vitamin B12, (3) hypersensitivity-related outcomes, and (4) endocrine and metabolic outcomes. The literature review document should be available by April 6, 2015, and will be posted to http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/730864. A document describing the approach for conducting the literature evaluation has also been prepared and is posted on the NTP Website (http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/ohat/folicacid/ntpfolicacid_approach_508.pdf). This document describing the approach includes information on the dose levels of folic acid being considered for the evaluation.

For more information go to http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/730864

Air date: 5/11/2015 8:00:00 AM


5/4/2015

NCCIH Integrative Medicine Research Lecture

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH; formerly NCCAM) presents the Integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series. The series provides overviews of the current state of research and practice involving complementary health approaches and explores perspectives on the emerging discipline of integrative medicine.

Gervasio Lamas, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.H.A., F.E.S.C., is the chairman of medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center and chief of the Columbia University Division of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Lamas is also professor of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and co-director of the Mount Sinai Heart Institute. In this lecture, Dr. Lamas will discuss his research exploring the effects of chelation therapy on coronary heart disease. Dr. Lamas will also talk about the benefits and risks of chelation therapy, interpret its effects on patients with diabetes, and provide insights for future chelation therapy research.

For more information go to https://nccih.nih.gov/news/events/IMlectures

Air date: 5/18/2015 10:00:00 AM


5/4/2015

To help achieve the goals of the Institute, the NACHHD Council is charged with advising, consulting with, and making recommendations to the NICHD director on matters relating to the research and research support activities and functions of the Institute.

Air date: 6/4/2015 8:00:00 AM


5/4/2015

NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture

Notch signaling occurs when cell surface Notch receptors are stimulated by Notch ligands on an apposing cell. This interaction leads to release of the Notch receptor intracellular domain which complexes with several factors in the nucleus to induce the expression of Notch target genes. A large variety of cell fate decisions depend on regulated Notch signaling during development and differentiation in mammals. Thus, several human diseases and cancers arise from the malfunctioning of Notch signaling pathways. Diseases range from skeletal deformities to heart disease to a variety of cancers. The O-fucose glycans attached to the extracellular domain of Notch receptors play critical but ill-defined roles in the regulation of Notch signaling. In their absence, mouse embryos die at mid-gestation with defects typical of a loss of signaling through all four Notch receptors. O-fucose on Notch receptors is elongated by the addition of another sugar GlcNAc by one of three Fringe GlcNAc-transferases. Dysregulation of Notch signaling by altered glycosyltransferase gene expression has been associated with developmental defects and cancer prognosis. The Stanley laboratory is working to understand molecular mechanisms by which O-fucose glycans and the different Fringe activities regulate Notch signaling. A particular challenge is that there are three Fringe genes, often expressed together in a given tissue. Stanley's lab has used genetic strategies to generate cultured cells and mice with Notch receptors that carry no fucose, or only O-fucose, or O-fucose with GlcNAc transferred by a single Fringe enzyme, to identify roles for O-fucose and each Fringe glycosyltransferase in embryonic development and in T and B cell development.

For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals

Air date: 5/6/2015 3:00:00 PM


5/4/2015

NLM Advisory Council Meeting

For more information go to http://www.nlm.nih.gov/od/bor/bor.html

Air date: 5/13/2015 9:00:00 AM


5/4/2015

NLM Advisory Council Meeting

For more information go to http://www.nlm.nih.gov/od/bor/bor.html

Air date: 5/12/2015 9:00:00 AM


5/4/2015

NIH Director's Seminar Series

Systemic autoimmune diseases comprise a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by a failure in self-tolerance to a wide variety of intracellular autoantigens, and include conditions like systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated-vasculitis.

Work at the Systemic Autoimmunity Branch has focused on characterizing the role that aberrant neutrophils play in the promotion of loss of immunological tolerance, amplification of inflammatory responses and direct end-organ damage in these diseases. One characteristic of neutrophils is their capacity to form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) upon exposure to danger signals. Dr. Kaplan's group identified a distinct subset of proinflammatory neutrophils in patients with specific systemic autoimmune diseases (lupus, vasculitis) that display exuberant capacity to form NETs in the absence of infection. She has proposed that NETs may play important roles in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases through externalization and modification of intracellular antigens, induction of distinct proinflammatory pathways and deleterious effects on the vasculature and other tissues. Her group has proposed a pathogenic crosstalk between neutrophils and type I IFNs that leads to crucial pro inflammatory pathways in lupus and its associated vascular damage.

Dr. Kaplan and her group have identified putative pathways of NET inhibition in autoimmune diseases that abrogate clinical phenotype, immune dysregulation and vasculopathy in lupus and atherosclerosis animal models. Ongoing studies are focusing on identifying mechanisms and pathways leading to autoimmune NET formation, their pathogenic implications in human disease and in the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

Air date: 5/8/2015 12:00:00 PM


5/1/2015

Lasker Lessons in Leadership is a lecture series aimed at bringing top scientists and medical leaders to the NIH to serve as inspiration for future leadership amongst the MD/PhD and PhD students enrolled in the NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program and the NIH Lasker Clinical Research Scholars Program.

Sponsored by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation, International Biomedical Research Alliance, NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program, Certara, and WCG

For more information go to http://oxcam.gpp.nih.gov

Air date: 5/19/2015 11:30:00 AM


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This page last reviewed: December 14, 2010